Angel "Java" Lopez en Blog

Ciencia


Publicado el 5 de Diciembre, 2016, 11:15

Anterior Post

No sabía que el tema del "corte" obtiene distintos resultados, según se use una imagen u otra:

Working with a finite cut-off, we have to search for quantities which are not sensitive to the precise
mode and value of the cut-off. We then find that the Schrodinger picture is not a suitable one. Solutions of the Schrodinger equation, even the one describing the vacuum state, are very sensitive to the cutoff. But there are some calculations that one can carry out in the Heisenberg picture that lead to results insensitive to the cut-off.

Notablemente, Dirac afirma que por este camino puede obtener el valor del corrimiento Lamb:

One can deduce in this way the Lamb-shift and the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron. The results are the same as those obtained some twenty years ago by the method of working rules with discard of infinities. But now the result can be obtained by a logical process, following standard mathematics in which only small quantities are neglected.

Pero perdemos los avances de la imagen Schrodinger:

As we cannot now use the Schrodinger picture, we cannot use the regular physical interpretation of quantum mechanics involving the square of the modulus of the wave function. We have to feel our way towards a new physical interpretation which can be used with the Heisenberg picture. The situation for quantum electrodynamics is rather like that for elementary quantum mechanics in the early days when we had the equations of motions but no general physical interpretation.

Nos leemos!

Angel "Java" Lopez
http://www.ajlopez.com
http://twitter.com/ajlopez


Por ajlopez, en: Ciencia

Publicado el 4 de Diciembre, 2016, 8:15

Anterior Post

Veamos que hay casos de operadores donde las autofunciones forman base. Sea un operador en un espacio vectorial de dimensión finita N. Entonces, ese operador puede expresarse como una matriz N x N. Para encontrar sus autovalores:

Donde M es una matriz cuadrada, lambda un número variable, rho es un vector columna. Si calculamos el determinante igualado a cero:

Obtenemos un polinomio de grado N, con incógnita lambda. Tiene que tener N raíces, tal vez algunas repetidas. Cada raíz es un autovalor, y por cada autovalor, tenemos un vector columna que es un autovector. Ya vimos que las autovectores de autovalores diferentes son ortogonales. Si algún autovalor se repite, igual podemos formar un subespacio con todos sus autovectores, y elegir una base ortonormal (siguiendo procedimientos conocidos de espacios vectoriales).

En definitiva, para estos operadores en dimensión finita N, tenemos autovectores que forman base. Como en general en los libros de divulgación se tratan ejemplos de este tipo, de dimensión finita, no tenemos mayor problema.

Pero hay casos donde no hay base de autovectores de manera tan simple. Veremos un caso sobre dimensión infinita no numerable en el próximo post.

Nos leemos!

Angel "Java" Lopez
http://www.ajlopez.com
http://twitter.com/ajlopez

Por ajlopez, en: Ciencia

Publicado el 30 de Noviembre, 2016, 15:01

Anterior Post
Siguiente Post

Este es un tema que amerita mayor consideración y detalle técnico. Por ahora, sigo citando y comentando brevemente a Dirac:

Let us see what can be done with putting the present quantum electrodynamics on a logical footing. We must keep to the standard practice of neglecting only quantities which one can believe to be small, even though the grounds for this belief may be rather shaky.

In order to handle infinities, we must refer to a process of cut-off. We must do this in mathematics whenever we have a series or an integral which is not absolutely convergent. When we have introduced a cut-off, we may proceed to make it more and more remote and go to a limit, which then depends on the method of cut-off. Alternatively, we may keep the cut-off finite. In the latter case, we must find quantities that are insensitive to the cutoff.

The divergencies in quantum electrodynamics come from the high-energy terms in the energy of interaction between the particles and the field. The cut-off thus involves introducing an energy, g say, beyond which the interaction energy terms are omitted. It is found that we cannot make g tend to infinity without destroying the possibility of solving the equations logically. We have to keep a finite cutoff.

Dirac prefiere perder la invariancia relativista que seguir en un problema de base:

The relativistic invariance of the theory is then destroyed. This is a pity, but it is a lesser evil than a departure from logic would be. It results in a theory which cannot be valid for high-energy processes, processes involving energies comparable with g, but we may still hope that it will be a good  approximation for low-energy processes.

On physical grounds we should expect to have to take g to be of the order of a few hundred Mev, as this is the region where quantum electrodynamics ceases to be a self-contained subject and the other particles of physics begin to play a role. This value for g is satisfactory for the theory.

Nos leemos!

Angel "Java" Lopez
http://www.ajlopez.com
http://twitter.com/ajlopez

Por ajlopez, en: Ciencia

Publicado el 21 de Noviembre, 2016, 17:51

Anterior Post
Siguiente Post

A Dirac le preocupa que en la explicación con modelo matemático de la interacción entre electrón y campo electromagnético, hay divergencias, integrales cuyas sumas divergen. Las divergencias surgen de tener que lidiar con singularidades en el campo, o en interacciones cada vez más cercanas, alrededor de un punto. El tema de llegar a divergencias (o a sumas infinitas) al disminuir las distancias es una señal que nos hace la naturaleza: para mí, nos está diciendo "el modelo que adoptaron es incorrecto, en la realidad no hay singularidades". Veamos que piensa Dirac:

If one deals classically with point electrons interacting with the electromagnetic field, one finds difficulties connected with the singularities in the field. People have been aware of these difficulties from the time of Lorentz, who first worked out the equations of motion for an electron. In the early days of the quantum mechanics of Heisenberg and Schrodinger, people thought these difficulties would be swept away by the new mechanics. It now became clear that these hopes would not be fulfilled. The difficulties reappear in the divergencies of quantum electrodynamics, the quantum theory of the interaction of electrons and the electromagnetic field. They are modified somewhat by the infinities associated with the sea of negative-energy electrons, but they stand out as the dominant problem.

De nuevo es un tema técnico, pero vemos que para Dirac es importante. Los físicos no siempre se preocupan a tal grado por alguna imperfección en la teoría, pero Dirac ha sido consecuente con sus ideas, y durante décadas pregonó sobre este problema "básico".

The difficulty of the divergencies proved to be a very bad one. No progress was made for twenty years. Then a development came, initiated by Lamb's discovery and explanation of the Lamb shift, which fundamentally changed the character of theoretical physics. It involved setting up rules for discarding the infinities, rules which are precise, so as to leave well-defined residues that can be compared with experiment. But still one is using working rules and not regular mathematics. Most theoretical physicists nowadays appear to be satisfied with this situation, but I am not. I believe that theoretical physics has gone on the wrong track with such developments and one should not be complacent about it. There is some similarity between this situation and the one in 1927, when most physicists were satisfied with the Klein-Gordon equation and did not let themselves be bothered by the negative probabilities that it entailed.

Como había yo mencionado, a Dirac le preocupaba que la Klein-Gordon pudiera producir probabilidades negativas. Notablemente, el efecto Lamb fue explicado exitosamente por la QED aún usando los trucos de eliminar los infinitos, siendo uno de los valores mejor deducidos de la historia de la física.

We must realize that there is something radically wrong when we have to discard infinities from our equations, and we must hang on to the basic ideas of logic at all costs. Worrying over this point may lead to an important advance. Quantum electrodynamics is the domain of physics that we know most about, and presumably it will have to be put in order before we can hope to make any fundamental progress with the other field theories, although these will continue to develop on the experimental basis.

Y no sólo aparecen divergencias en electrodinámica cuántica.

Nos leemos!

Angel "Java" Lopez
http://www.ajlopez.com
http://twitter.com/ajlopez

Por ajlopez, en: Ciencia

Publicado el 20 de Noviembre, 2016, 14:13

Anterior Post
Siguiente Post

¿Por qué encuentra energía negativa? Porque al pasar a relatividad, la expresión del operador energía se ve transformado por una raíz cuadrada, que en mecánica cuántica se traduce en que los dos valores son posible. Es algo técnico para discutirlo ahora en detalle, pero el resultado es que la solución de Dirac hace aparece no SOLO un spinor sino DOS spinores. Y el tema de las energías negativas da para la aparición de uno de los temas más interesantes del siglo pasado: el descubrimiento de las antipartículas.

As frequently happens with the mathematical procedure in research, the solving of one difficulty leads to another. You may think that no real progress is then made, but this is not so, because the second difficulty is more remote than the first. It may be that the second difficulty was really there all the time, and was only brought into prominence by the removal of the first.

This was the case with the negative energy difficulty. All relativistic theories give symmetry between positive and negative energies, but previously this difficulty had been overshadowed by more crude imperfections in the theory.

The difficulty is removed by the assumption that in the vacuum all the negative energy states are filled. One is then led to a theory of positrons together with electrons. Our knowledge is thereby advanced one stage, but again a new difficulty appears, this time connected with the interaction between an electron and the electromagnetic field.

Eso de tener todos los estados negativos llenos solo sirve cuando manipulamos fermiones, partículas que obedecen al principio de exclusión de Pauli.

When one writes down the equations that one believes should describe this interaction accurately and tries to solve them, one gets divergent integrals for quantities that ought to be finite. Again this difficulty was really present all the time, lying dormant in the theory, and only now becoming the dominant one.

Esta divergencia es la que realmente preocupa a Dirac, como veremos en los próximos posts.

Nos leemos!

Angel "Java" Lopez
http://www.ajlopez.com
http://twitter.com/ajlopez

Por ajlopez, en: Ciencia

Publicado el 19 de Noviembre, 2016, 14:30

Anterior Post
Siguiente Post

Pero Dirac tenía más que aportar a la nueva mecánica cuántica que los corchetes de Poisson. Estos ponían de manifiesto la no conmutatividad, algo que NO es clásico:

With the development of quantum mechanics one had a new situation in theoretical physics. The basic equations, Heisenberg's equations of motion, the commutation relations and Schrodinger's wave equation were discovered without their physical interpretation being known. With noncommutation of the dynamical variables, the direct interpretation that one was used to in classical mechanics was not possible, and it became a problem to find the precise meaning and mode of application of the new equations.

Había que aprender a manejar correctamente el nuevo aparato matemático:

This problem was not solved by a direct attack. People first studied examples, such as the nonrelativistic hydrogen atom and Compton scattering, and found special methods that worked for these examples. One gradually generalized, and after a few years the complete understanding of the theory was evolved as we know it today, with Heisenberg's principle of uncertainty and the general statistical interpretation of the wave function.

Eso se hizo, pero en general, dentro del régimen no relativístico. Había habido algún progreso, pero no satisfacía a Dirac:

The early rapid progress of quantum mechanics was made in a nonrelativistic setting, but of course people were not happy with this situation. A relativistic theory for a single electron was set up, namely Schrodinger's original equation, which was rediscovered by Klein and Gordon and is known by their name, but its interpretation was not consistent with the general statistical interpretation of quantum mechanics.

Para Dirac, la ecuación de Klein y Gordon no era adecuada, porque al aplicarla daba probabilidades tantos positivas como negativas. Pasaron algunos años hasta que Pauli la volvió a aplicar, esta vez sobre probabilidades de carga eléctrica.

Había un aparato matemático, los tensores, que se habían aplicado hasta entonces en toda teoría relativista, pero que se "quedaban cortos" en cuanto se los aplicaba en cuántica, como en la ecuación de Klein-Gordon.

As relativity was then understood, all relativistic theories had to be expressible in tensor form. On
this basis one could not do better than the Klein-Gordon theory. Most physicists were content with the Klein-Gordon theory as the best possible relativistic quantum theory for an electron, but I was always dissatisfied with the discrepancy between it and general principles, and continually worried over it till I found the solution.

Parece que Pauli fue el primero en usar espinores, luego adoptados entusiastamente por Dirac:

Tensors are inadequate and one has to get away from them, introducing two-valued quantities, now called spinors. Those people who were too familiar with tensors were not fitted to get away from them and think up something more general, and I was able to do so only because I was more attached to the general principles of quantum mechanics than to tensors. Eddington was very surprised when he saw the possibility of departing from tensors. One should always guard against getting too attached to one particular line of thought.

Y hasta trajeron un regalo inesperado: la explicación del spin del electrón:

The introduction of spinors provided a relativistic theory in agreement with the general principles of quantum mechanics, and also accounted for the spin of the electron, although this was not the original intention of the work. But then a new problem appeared, that of negative energies. The theory gives symmetry between positive and negative energies, while only positive energies occur in nature.

En el próximo post, veremos cómo aún esta dificultad fue fructífera, de una manera que aún Dirac no supo prever.

Nos leemos!

Angel "Java" Lopez
http://www.ajlopez.com
http://twitter.com/ajlopez

Por ajlopez, en: Ciencia

Publicado el 30 de Octubre, 2016, 16:58

Anterior Post

Veamos hoy otro artículo sobre el tema:

An Introduction to Second Quantization
http://www.phys.lsu.edu/~jarrell/COURSES/ADV_SOLID_HTML/Other_online_texts/Sandeep_Pathak/second_quantization_orig.pdf

Este no parte de la ecuación de Schrodinger, extendida a varias partículas. Se mete directamente en mostrar que hay espacios de Hilbert expandidos a varias dimensiones, una por partícula. En realidad, productos directos de espacios de Hilbert.

Y al considerar dos partículas, trata el caso de la partícula 1 en el estado |1> y la partícula 2 en el estado |2>, y lo desarrolla como multiplicación de funciones. Lo mismo para la partícula 1 en el estado |2> y la partícula 2 en el estado |1>. Llega así una expresión en determinante (el determinante de Slater), para partículas antisimétricas (igual que otros "papers" que examinamos, sólo PONE que hay partículas indistinguibles antisimétricas, los fermiones, y partículas indistinguibles simétricas, los bosones, pero no se detiene a explicar por qué). Llega a expresar dos fermiones como un determinante de Slater, de funciones, de una matriz dos por dos. Luego lo extiende a más fermiones.

Cuando hace el tratamiento de bosones, el resultado es una permanente de Slater.

Luego pasa a la representación de número de ocupación, que parece más intuitiva. E introduce los operadores de creación y destrucción de fermiones y bosones.

Aclara que no se puede observar el momento de una partícula, indistiguible de otras, sólo podemos hablar de las sumas de momentos de las partículas indistinguibles. Termina con algunos ejemplos de aplicación de estas ideas.

Nos leemos!

Angel "Java" Lopez
http://www.ajlopez.com
http://twitter.com/ajlopez

Por ajlopez, en: Ciencia

Publicado el 26 de Octubre, 2016, 14:35

Anterior Post
Siguiente Post

Otro texto que tengo que estudiar y entender, es:

Introduction to Second Quantization
http://www.phys.ens.fr/~mora/lecture-second-quanti.pdf

Lo interesante es que muestra cómo sería el tema de múltiples partículas, partiendo de la primera cuantización. Leo:

Part of the complexity in the many-body problem - systems involving many particles - comes from the indistinguishability of identical particles, fermions or bosons. Calculations in first quantization thus involve the cumbersome (anti-)symmetrization of wavefunctions.

Second quantization is an efficient technical tool that describes many-body systems in a compact and intuitive way. 

No es la primera vez que leo sobre funciones de ondas simétricas y anti-simétricas, en el esquema de primera cuantización. Es un tema que tengo que estudiar, pero está relacionado con las diferencias entre bosones y fermiones. Desconozco todavía por qué son "cumbersome", pero al parecer, la segunda cuantización evita los problema de su utilización.

Comienzan a aparecer espacios de Hilbert de varias dimensiones. Por ejemplo, una partícula de spin 1/2 en el medio de un campo magnético, tiene dos "eigenstates" de operador de spin, y estos generan un espacio de Hilbert de dimensión dos.

En la segunda cuantización, se utiliza una forma distinta de nombrar los estados de base. Además se agregan operadores de creación y aniquilación de partículas.

Si bien me resulta algo intuitivo ese paso, tengo que revisar mejor el mismo desarrollo usando solamente la primera cuantización.

Nos leemos!

Angel "Java" Lopez
http://www.ajlopez.com
http://twitter.com/ajlopez

Por ajlopez, en: Ciencia

Publicado el 25 de Octubre, 2016, 7:30

Siguiente Post

La segunda cuantización es un tema que sigue apareciendo en mis lecturas, pero no todavía en los posts de esto blog. En estos meses, ha vuelto a aparecer en libros que estoy estudiando, en el tema computación cuántica.

Venga hoy una nota sobre algunas fuentes que estoy consultando. Primero

First and Second Quantization
http://www.iue.tuwien.ac.at/phd/pourfath/node109.html

Es interesante ver en este artículo por qué lo de "segunda". Siguiendo el tratamiento de Schrodinger, uno puede representar el estado de una partícula con una función de onda cuya evolución en el tiempo cumple con la ecuación de Schrodinger. El problema se presenta cuando uno quiere representar de la misma forma más de una partícula como sistema, teniendo estas partículas interacciones entre sí (si no tuvieran interacciones, la solución a la ecuación de Schrodinger de TODO el sistema, por linealidad, sería igual a la suma de las soluciones indivuales, partícula por partícula).

Copio de ese artículo el párrafo:

Historically, quantum physics first dealt only with the quantization of the motion of particles, leaving the electromagnetic field classical (SCHRÖDINGER, HEISENBERG, and DIRAC, 1925-26). Later also the electromagnetic field was quantized (DIRAC, 1927), and even the particles themselves got represented by quantized fields (JORDAN and WIGNER, 1927), resulting in the development of quantum electrodynamics and quantum field theory in general.

Conozco superficialmente el trabajo de Schrodinger, Heisenberg, y Dirac, mencionado. Y el "paper" de Dirac de 1927. Me faltaría conocer el trabajdo de Jordan y Wigner, no sabía que ellos habían sido los primeros en representar a las "partículas" como campos cuantizados. Ahí hay un tema interesante y profundo, que aún se discute: la entidad ontológica de "partícula", como algo emergente de los campos o como algo básico de la estructura del universo.

Y ahora viene la explicación de "segunda":

By convention, the original form of quantum mechanics is denoted first quantization, while quantum field theory is formulated in the language of second quantization. Second quantization greatly simplifies the discussion of many interacting particles. This approach merely reformulates the original SCHRÖDINGER equation. Nevertheless, it has the advantage that in second quantization operators incorporate the statistics, which contrasts with the more cumbersome approach of using symmetrized or anti-symmetrized products of single-particle wave functions.

Lo de "statistics" se refiere a que en el tratamiento de la segunda cuantización se distingue claramente entre bosones y fermiones, que tienen distinta "estadística", pues los fermiones, al cumplir con el principio de exclusión de Pauli, no pueden estar dos en el mismo estado, mientras que los bosones (como los fotones) sí pueden "agruparse" en el mismo estado.

Se dice que la segunda cuantización es la forma de tratar los campos cuánticos. PERO NO ES LA UNICA, eso no está siempre claro en los artículos que estoy leyendo. Por ejemplo, Zee en su libro de introducción a esos campos, no parece utilizar este formalismo, representación, sino que sigue el camino de las múltiples trayectorias de Feynman (al parecer, camino que también nació con el artículo de Dirac de 1927).

Nos leemos!

Angel "Java" Lopez
http://www.ajlopez.com
http://twitter.com/ajlopez

Por ajlopez, en: Ciencia

Publicado el 24 de Octubre, 2016, 14:04

Anterior Post

Veamos hoy qué unificación apareció en los sesenta del siglo pasado:

We are now in a position to return to the subject of unification. In the late 1960s the Weinberg–Salam model of electroweak interactions put together electromagnetism and the weak force into a unified framework. This unified model was neither dictated nor justified only by considerations of simplicity or elegance. It was necessary for a predictive and consistent theory of the weak interactions. The theory is initially formulated with four massless particles that carry the forces. A process of symmetry breaking gives mass to three of these particles: the W+, the W−, and the Z0. These particles are the carriers of the weak force. The particle that remains massless is the photon, which is the carrier of the electromagnetic force.

Aunque no lo menciona, el bosón de Higgs (en realidad sus cuatro variedades) tiene su relación con estas partículas W+, W-, Z0. De hecho, tres variedades de Higgs se acoplan a estas partículas, y otra queda "suelta", la que conocemos como "el" bosón de Higgs.

El modelo de estas fuerzas es la de los campos cuánticos. Cada fuerza despliega un campo de este tipo (diferente de un campo clásico), y cada campo convive con los demás, pero con interacciones entre ellos.

Maxwell’s equations, as we discussed before, are equations of classical electromagnetism. They do not provide a quantum theory. Physicists have discovered quantization methods, which can be used to turn a classical theory into a quantum theory – a theory that can be calculated using the principles of quantum mechanics. While classical electrodynamics can be used confidently to calculate the transmission of energy in power lines and the radiation patterns of radio antennas, it is neither an accurate nor a correct theory for microscopic phenomena. Quantum electrodynamics (QED), the quantum version of classical electrodynamics, is required for correct computations in this arena. In QED, the photon appears as the quantum of the electromagnetic field. The theory of weak interactions is also a quantum theory of particles, so the correct, unified theory is the quantum electroweak theory.

El procedimiento de cuantizar campos ha sido exitoso en todas las fuerzas:

The quantization procedure is also successful in the case of the strong color force, and the resulting theory has been called quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The carriers of the color force are eight massless particles. These are colored gluons, and just like the quarks, they cannot be observed in isolation. The quarks respond to the gluons because they carry color. Quarks can come in three colors.

Nos leemos!

Angel "Java" Lopez
http://www.ajlopez.com
http://twitter.com/ajlopez

Por ajlopez, en: Ciencia

Publicado el 23 de Octubre, 2016, 15:00

Anterior Post
Siguiente Post

Otro de los desarrollos que culminaron en el siglo XX, es la existencia de CUATRO fuerzas fundamentales. Su descubrimiento es una larga historia, si bien ya en tiempos de Maxwell, en el siglo XIX, se hizo claro la existencia de las dos fuerzas más conocidas, la gravedad y el electromagnetismo. Leo:

In addition to these developments, four fundamental forces had been recognized to exist in nature. Let us have a brief look at them.

One of them is the force of gravity. This force has been known since antiquity, but it was first described accurately by Isaac Newton. Gravity underwent a profound reformulation in Albert Einstein"s theory of general relativity. In this theory, the spacetime arena of special relativity acquires a life of its own, and gravitational forces arise from the curvature of this dynamical spacetime. Einstein"s general relativity is a classical theory of gravitation. It is not formulated as a quantum theory.

The second fundamental force is the electromagnetic force. As we discussed above, the electromagnetic force is well described by Maxwell"s equations. Electromagnetism, or Maxwell theory, is formulated as a classical theory of electromagnetic fields. As opposed to Newtonian mechanics, which was modified by special relativity, Maxwell theory is fully consistent with special relativity.

The third fundamental force is the weak force. This force is responsible for the process of nuclear beta decay, in which a neutron decays into a proton, an electron, and an antineutrino. In general, processes that involve neutrinos are mediated by weak forces. While nuclear beta decay had been known since the end of the nineteenth century, the recognition that a new force was at play did not take hold until the middle of the twentieth century. The strength of this force is measured by the Fermi constant. Weak interactions are much weaker than electromagnetic interactions.

Finally, the fourth force is the strong force, nowadays called the color force. This force is at play in holding together the constituents of the neutron, the proton, the pions, and many other subnuclear particles. These constituents, called quarks, are held so tightly by the color force that they cannot be seen in isolation.

En el próximo post volveremos a la primera unificación de estas fuerzas en el siglo XX

Nos leemos!

Angel "Java" Lopez
http://www.ajlopez.com 
http://twitter.com/ajlopez

Por ajlopez, en: Ciencia

Publicado el 22 de Octubre, 2016, 15:44

Anterior Post
Siguiente Post

La unificación de Maxwell fue la primera de varias. Leo:

Another fundamental unification of two types of phenomena occurred in the late 1960s, about one-hundred years after the work of Maxwell. This unification revealed the deep relationship between electromagnetic forces and the forces responsible for weak interactions. To appreciate the significance of this unification it is necessary first to review the main developments that occurred in physics since the time of Maxwell.

Esa unificación de los sesenta fue la que impulsó de nuevo el camino de la unificación, que había quedado algo congelado, al no haber avances concretos. Pero para llegar a esa unificación hubo que pasar por varios desarrollos:

An important change of paradigm was triggered by Albert Einstein"s special theory of relativity. In this theory one finds a striking conceptual unification of the separate notions of space and time. Different from a unification of forces, the merging of space and time into a spacetime continuum represented a new recognition of the nature of the arena where physical phenomena take place. Newtonian mechanics was replaced by relativistic mechanics, and older ideas of absolute time were abandoned. Mass and energy were shown to be interchangeable.

El otro gran avance de la física en los comienzos del siglo XX fue la física cuántica:

Another change of paradigm, perhaps an even more dramatic one, was brought forth by the discovery of quantum mechanics. Developed by Erwin Schrödinger, Werner Heisenberg, Paul Dirac and others, quantum theory was verified to be the correct framework to describe microscopic phenomena. In quantum mechanics classical observables become operators. If two operators fail to commute, the corresponding observables cannot be measured simultaneously. Quantum mechanics is a framework, more than a theory. It gives the rules by which theories must be used to extract physical predictions.

De la unión de ambos desarrollos nacieron las teorías de campos cuánticos. Seguiremos en el próximo post.

Nos leemos!

Angel "Java" Lopez
http://www.ajlopez.com
http://twitter.com/ajlopez

Por ajlopez, en: Ciencia

Publicado el 16 de Octubre, 2016, 12:54

Anterior Post
Siguiente Post

Ahora bien, Heisenberg y Schrodinger siguieron distintos métodos para el mismo tema:

Heisenberg and Schrodinger gave us two forms of quantum mechanics, which were soon found to be equivalent. They provided two pictures, with a certain mathematical transformation connecting them.

Pero Dirac también tenía algo para aportar:

I joined in the early work on quantum mechanics, following the procedure based on mathematics, with a very abstract point of view. I took the noncommutative algebra which was suggested by Heisenberg's matrices as the main feature for a new dynamics, and examined how classical dynamics could be adapted to fit in with it. Other people were working on the subject from various points of view, and we all obtained equivalent results, at about the same time.

Como menciona, lo importante para él fue la no conmutatividad que exhibía el modelo matemático.

I would like to mention that I found the best ideas usually came, not when one was actively striving for them, but when one was in a more relaxed state. Professor Bethe has told us how he got ideas on railway trains and often worked them out before the end of the journey. It was not like that with me. I used to take long solitary walks on Sundays, during which I tended to review the current situation in a leisurely way. Such occasions often proved fruitful, even though (or perhaps because) the primary purpose of the walk was relaxation and not research.

It was on one of these occasions that the possibility occurred to me of a connection between
commutators and Poisson brackets. I did not then know very well what a Poisson bracket was, so was very uncertain of the connection. On getting home I  found I did not have any book explaining Poisson brackets, so I had to wait impatiently for the libraries to open the following morning before I could verify the idea.

Ver Dirac revisando el trabajo de Heisenberg.

Nos leemos!

Angel "Java" Lopez
http://www.ajlopez.com
http://twitter.com/ajlopez

Por ajlopez, en: Ciencia

Publicado el 10 de Octubre, 2016, 16:00

Anterior Post
Siguiente Post

Luego de presentar los trabajos de Heisenberg y Schrodinger, como ejemplos de dos métodos distintos aplicados al mismo problema físico, Dirac nos recuerda la gran influencia de la relatividad en aquellos tiempos (la tercera década del siglo XX):

In order to understand the atmosphere in which theoretical physicists were then working, one must appreciate the enormous influence of relativity. Relativity had burst into the world of scientific thought with a tremendous impact, at the end of a long and difficult war. Everyone wanted to get away from the strain of war and eagerly seized on the new mode of thought and new philosophy. The excitement was quite unprecedented in the history of science.

Against this background of excitement, physicists were trying to understand the mystery of the stability of atoms. Schrodinger, like everyone else, was caught up by the new ideas, and so he tried to set up a quantum mechanics within the framework of relativity. Everything had to be expressed in terms of vectors and tensors in space-time. This was unfortunate, as the time was not ripe for a relativistic quantum mechanics, and Schrodinger's discovery was delayed in consequence.

Ciertamente, Schrodinger podría haber llegado antes a sus resultados si relajaba la cuestión relativista.

Schrodinger was working from a beautiful idea of de Broglie connecting waves and particles in a relativistic way. De Broglie's idea applied only to free particles, and Schrodinger tried to generalize it to an electron bound in an atom. Eventually he succeeded, keeping within the relativistic framework. But when he applied his theory to the hydrogen atom, he found it did not agree with experiment. The discrepancy was due to his not having taken the spin of the electron into account. It was not then known. Schrodinger subsequently noticed that his theory was correct in the nonrelativistic approximation, and he had to reconcile himself to publishing this degraded version of his work, which he did after some month's delay.

The moral of this story is that one should not try to accomplish too much in one go. One should separate the difficulties in physics one from another as far as possible, and then dispose of them one by one.

Sería principalmente Dirac el que agregaría de forma adecuada el marco relativista a la nueva mecánica cuántica. Desde sus años de estudiante, Dirac siempre trataba de generalizar teorías para que fueran compatibles con la relatividad especial de Einstein, y de paso, dando cuenta del spin del electrón (la historia del spin vale varios post aparte).

Nos leemos!

Angel "Java" Lopez
http://www.ajlopez.com
http://twitter.com/ajlopez

Por ajlopez, en: Ciencia

Publicado el 30 de Septiembre, 2016, 14:26

Anterior Post
Siguiente Post

En el anterior post, comentaba que Dirac tenía un ejemplo de aplicación de los dos métodos que proponía, sobre el mismo tema. El ejemplo es el de la mecánica cuántica:

Whether one follows the experimental or the mathematical procedure depends largely on the
subject of study, but not entirely so. It also depends on the man. This is illustrated by the discovery of quantum mechanics.

Two men are involved, Heisenberg and Schrodinger. Heisenberg was working from the experimental basis, using the results of spectroscopy, which by 1925 had accumulated an enormous amount of data. Much of this was not useful, but some was, for example, the relative intensities of the lines of a multiplet. It was Heisenberg's genius that he was able to pick out the important things from the great wealth of information and arrange them in a natural scheme. He was thus led to matrices.

Schrodinger's approach was quite different. He worked from the mathematical basis. He was not well informed about the latest spectroscopic results, like Heisenberg was, but had the idea at the back of his mind that spectral frequencies should be fixed by eigenvalue equations, something like those that fix the frequencies of systems of vibrating springs. He had this idea for a long time, and was eventually able to find the right equation, in an indirect way.

Yo igual mencionaría que el trabajo de Heisenberg también partía de un modelo matemático, el desarrollo en serie de Fourier y aledaños, para sí. basado en los datos experimentales, proponer un salto en ese modelo.

Nos leemos!

Angel "Java" Lopez
http://www.ajlopez.com
http://twitter.com/ajlopez

Por ajlopez, en: Ciencia

Publicado el 29 de Septiembre, 2016, 17:24

Anterior Post
Siguiente Post

Dirac describe dos métodos para aplicar en la física teórica. El segundo hace énfasis en los modelos matemáticos de las teorías físicas. Distingue dos caminos en este método:

- Eliminar las inconsistencias
- Unir teorías que estaban separadas

Para el primer camino recuerda éxitos en la historia, como el trabajo de Maxwell que trabajando sobre lo que se conocía en su tiempo sobre el electromagnetismo y sus inconsistencias en ecuaciones, introduce la corriente de desplazamiento que lo lleva a la teoría de las ondas electromagnéticas. O el estudio de Plank de las dificultades de la radiación de cuerpo negro que lo llevó a la introducción de su famosa constante. Años más tarde, Einstein notó una dificultad en la descripción del equilibrio de un átomo inmerso en radiación de cuerpo negro, e introdujo la emisión estimulada, que permitió el desarrollo de los láseres. Pero el supremo ejemplo que expone, es el de la teoría de la gravitación de Einstein, que logró conciliar la gravitación de Newton con las nuevas ideas de la relatividad especial, y hasta explicar la anómala órbita de Mercurio.

En cambio, según Dirac, el segundo método no ha resultado tan fructífero. Cita el fracaso de Einstein tratando de unificar por años el electromagnetismo con la gravedad. Como no ve que en el caso de teorías disjuntas haya alguna clara anomalía a resolver, ve que si el éxito en la unificación se alcanza alguna vez es por medio de caminos indirectos.

Luego vuelve a comparar los métodos basados en experimentación y en modelos matemáticos. Piensa que cuál camino tomar depende en gran medida del campo de estudio. Si este campo es nuevo, es más provechoso dedicarse a la experimentación para ir teniendo más datos reales sobre los que edificar un futuro modelo matemático. Sin embargo, cita como ejemplo de uso de los DOS métodos sobre un mismo campo, a la historia de la mecánica cuántica.

Tema para próximo post.

Nos leemos!

Angel "Java" Lopez
http://www.ajlopez.com
http://twitter.com/ajlopez

Por ajlopez, en: Ciencia

Publicado el 28 de Septiembre, 2016, 13:27

Anterior Post
Siguiente Post

Dirac hace diferencia en cuál de los dos métodos aplicar, según el tema de estudio. Si éste es un tema del que se sabe poco, prefiere encarar el método experimental. Al principio uno va coleccionando datos, de los experimentos. Como ejemplo pone el desarrollo del sistema periódico de los elementos, que culminó en el siglo XIX. En el comienzo, se fueron conociendo datos experimentales, y sólo cuando abundante información, se pudo poner algún orden a esos datos. Cuando en el sistema que se fue armando, había un agujero (faltaba un átomo) la confianza adquirida con los datos y el sistema periódico permitió predecir el llenado de ese agujero con un nuevo átomo.

Dirac menciona como situación similar a la de la física de partículas de altas energías (dicta la conferencia en 1968). Ya hay una confianza en el modelo armado, de tal manera que cuando parece que hay un "gap" en ese modelo, se predice una nueva partícula, que finalmente se encuentra (notablemente, la búsqueda de uno de los bosones de Higgs llevó décadas hasta llegar a nuestro siglo).

Cuando se sabe poco de un tema, Dirac llama la atención sobre la especulación. No la desecha, pero nos pone en guardia de no abusar. ¿Y cuál tema pone como especulativo en la física de su tiempo, que prosigue hasta nuestros días? A la cosmología.

Leo:

One field of work in which there has been too much speculation is cosmology. There are very few hard facts to go on, but theoretical workers have been busy constructing various models for the universe, based on any assumptions that they fancy. These models are probably all wrong. It is usually assumed that the laws of nature have always been the same as they are now. There is no justification for this. The laws may be changing, and in particular quantities which are considered to be constants of nature may be varying with cosmological time. Such variations would completely upset the model makers.

Es notable la idea de considerar que las leyes no son constantes. Es un tema más que interesante, y no sé cuál es el estado actual de la cuestión. Con las ideas de unificación de las fuerzas, se pone un modelo donde las fuerzas convergen a grandes energías. Pero habría que explorar también todas las consecuencias de considerar que las leyes actuales no fueron siempre las mismas. Por ejemplo, tal vez podrían explicarse los cuásar, al poner que en un tiempo pasado las constantes de acoplamiento de las fuerzas conocidas eran distintas.

En próximo post, comentaré sobre Dirac y sus ideas de la aplicación del segundo método, el matemático.

Nos leemos!

Angel "Java" Lopez
http://www.ajlopez.com
http://twitter.com/ajlopez

Por ajlopez, en: Ciencia

Publicado el 26 de Septiembre, 2016, 14:04

Siguiente Post

Hace pocos días recordaba una conferencia en Trieste, de Dirac, que encuentro en un volumen junto con un texto de Adbus Salam y Heisenberg (ver Inconsistencias en teorías físicas). Es interesante que en esa conferencia, titulada Métodos en Física Teórica, Dirac plantea que hay dos métodos:

I shall attempt to give you some idea of how a theoretical physicist works - how he sets about trying to get a better understanding of the laws of nature.

One can look back over the work that has been done in the past. In doing so one has the underlying hope at the back of one's mind that one may get some hints or learn some lessons that will be of value in dealing with present-day problems. The problems that we had to deal with in the past had fundamentally much in common with the present day ones, and reviewing the successful methods of the past may give us some help for the present.

One can distinguish between two main procedures for a theoretical physicist. One of them is to work from the experimental basis. For this, one must keep in close touch with the experimental physicists. One reads about all the results they obtain and tries to fit them into a comprehensive and satisfying scheme.

The other procedure is to work from the mathematical basis. One examines and criticizes the
existing theory. One tries to pin-point the faults in it and then tries to remove them. The difficulty here is to remove the faults without destroying the very great successes of the existing theory.

There are these two general procedures, but of course the distinction between them is not hard-and-fast. There are all grades of procedures between the extremes.

Es interesante discutir esta distinción de Dirac. El trabajar desde lo matemático no es sencillo, y no siempre es posible. En próximo post, mencionaré cuándo Dirac recomienda uno u otro métodos.

Nos leemos!

Angel "Java" Lopez
http://www.ajlopez.com
http://twitter.com/ajlopez

Por ajlopez, en: Ciencia

Publicado el 25 de Septiembre, 2016, 11:54

Anterior Post

La mecánica cuántica debe coincidir con la física clásica en los casos límite. Se puede decir que la cuántica contiene a la clásica, así como la relatividad einsteniana contiene a la física newtoniana. Hemos visto en estos posts que en la mecánica cuántica el estado de un sistema físico se describe con una función de onda. Así, un electrón se describe por una función de onda, perdiéndose el concepto clásico de trayectoria. Las coordenadas del electrón (parte de su estado) está como desperdigado, ya no tiene valores concretos que dependan del tiempo. Ahora esas coordenadas y otros estados, se deben extraer desde la función de onda. Y así como la función de onda representa el estado, hay operadores lineales que actúan sobre la función de onda para obtener, extraer los valores de algunas magnitudes físicas. No hemos visto un ejemplo concreto ni de operador ni de función de onda. Veamos un camino para conseguir una función de onda que en el límite se aproxime a la formulación clásica.

En la mecánica clásica, entonces, un electrón tiene trayectoria, y en la mecánica cuántica, no la tiene. Hay una relación similar en física clásica, entre la óptica de ondas y la óptica geométrica. En la óptica ondulatoria se definen ondas electromagnéticas, usando los vectores de los campos eléctrico y magnético. Estos vectores satisfacen un sistema de ecuaciones diferenciales lineales, las ecuaciones de Maxwell. En cambio, en la óptica geomética, la luz se propaga en rayos. Podemos plantear una analogía entre el paso al límite de la cuántica a la clásica. Podemos plantear que ese paso es análogo a lo que se hace al pasar de la óptica ondulatoria a la geométrica.

¿Cómo se hace este paso en óptica? La óptica geométrica estudia la propagación de las ondas electromagnéticas (como la luz), como propagación de rayos. Si la onda que estamos considerando fuera plana (sus componentes dependen solo del tiempo y de la dirección de propagación, que podemos tomar como el eje x en sentido positivo), los rayos son tangentes a la dirección de propagación. Se pueden considerar ondas planas cuando la longitud de onda es muy chica.

Pero todo esto merece un tratamiento más detallado. El campo electromagnético se define por un campo eléctrico E y un campo magnético H. Cada uno de esos campos es vectorial, es decir, por cada valor de las coordenadas (espaciales y tiempo) queda definido un vector eléctrico y un vector magnético. Estos vectores se pueden derivar de otro campo, el llamado campo potencial A, y de ecuaciones de Maxwell que los relacionan. Pero por ahora, ocupémonos de la expresión de cualquier componente de los vectores E y H.

Sea f una de esas componentes, entonces, en óptica ondulatoria, se sabe que:

Al coeficiente

Se lo llama amplitud, y depende de las coordenadas espaciales y el tiempo. Se supone que varía lentamente en el tiempo. Al exponente:

Se lo llama fase o iconal, y también es función de las coordenadas espaciales y el tiempo. Pero lo importante ahora, es que varía rápidamente si la longitud de onda es corta. En el caso de una onda plana, la fase tiene una expresión simple:

Donde k es un vector, llamado vector de onda. Y r es el vector posición.

En el próximo post seguiremos estudiando este camino, el paso de la óptica ondulatoria a la geométrica, y la analogía con el caso cuántico.

Nos leemos!

Angel "Java" Lopez
http://www.ajlopez.com
http://twitter.com/ajlopez

Por ajlopez, en: Ciencia

Publicado el 24 de Septiembre, 2016, 11:59

Ya comenté sobre el primer encuentro de Heisenberg con Niels Bohr en:

Bohr y Heisenberg, Primer Encuentro
Bohr según Pauli y Heisenberg

Luego de la conferencia de Bohr, Heisenberg plantea sus dudas sobre el estado de algunos problemas. Leo en la conferencia que dio en Trieste, en 1968 (mencionada en el libro de Abdus Salam, La unificación de las fuerzas fundamentales, que mencioné en P.A.M.Dirac, por Abdus Salam):

After two years of study, in the summer of 1922, Sommerfeld asked me whether I would be willing to follow him to a meeting at which Bohr would present his theory in Gottingen. These days in Gottingen we now always refer to as the "Bohrfestival". There for the first time I learned how a man like Bohr worked on problems of atomic physics. When Bohr had given two of his lectures I dared once in a discussion to utter some criticism; I just mentioned some doubts, whether the formulae of Kramers which he had written on the blackboard could be exact. I knew from our discussions in Munich that we always get formulae which are half exact, which are partly right and partly not right so I felt that it was never too certain. Bohr was very kind and in spite of the fact that I was a very young student, he asked me for a long walk on the Hainberg near Gottingen to discuss the problem.

Heisenberg apuntaba bien en sus dudas. Así comenzó a conocer a Bohr y su estilo:

I feel it was then that I felt I really learned what it means to work on an entirely new field in theoretical physics. The first, for me quite shocking experience was that Bohr had calculated nothing. He had just guessed his results. He knew the experimental situation in chemistry, he knew the valencies of the various atoms and he knew that his idea of the quantization of the orbits or rather his idea of the stability of the atom to be explained by the phenomenon of quantization, fitted somehow with the experimental situation in chemistry. On this basis he simply guessed what he then gave us as his results. I asked him whether he really believed that one could derive these results by means of calculations based on classical mechanics. He said "Well, I think that those classical pictures which I draw of the atoms are just as good as classical pictures can be" and he explained it in the following way. He said "we are now in a new field of physics, in which we know that the old concepts probably don't work. We see that they don't work, because otherwise atoms wouldn't be stable. On the other hand when we want to speak about atoms, we must use words and these words can only be taken from the old concepts, from the old language. Therefore we are in a hopeless dilemma, we are like sailors coming to a very far away country. They don't know the country and they see people whose language they have never heard, so they don't know how to communicate. Therefore, so far as the classical concepts work, that is, so far as we can speak about the motion of electrons, about their velocity, about their energy, etc., I think that my pictures are correct or at least I hope that they are correct, but nobody knows how far such a language goes".

Esto impresionó mucho a Heisenberg: estaban en un nuevo territorio de la física, y los conceptos clásicos tenían que ser revisados. El propio Heisenberg entonces no manejaba toda la física clásica, era joven, y todo esto influyó para que se animara a explorar nuevas formas de resolver los problemas planteados por Bohr y otros.

Nos leemos!

Angel "Java" Lopez
http://www.ajlopez.com
http://twitter.com/ajlopez

Por ajlopez, en: Ciencia

Otros mensajes en Ciencia